History

repeats itself

Adelong's most successful gold ore crushing plant

Posted by barbara on October 23, 2012

All along Adelong Creek in southern NSW, ore crushing mills extracted gold from local bedrock.
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During a short window of opportunitity in the early 1800s, Aboriginal people fashioned a new kind of existence, clinging onto their country where their presence was tolerated by the Europeans who'd usurped their lands.
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Gold in name, the start of the rush

Posted by barbara on June 4, 2011

Ophir (pronounced o-fear) is an odd sounding name for a tiny locality north east of Orange, NSW. But for those with an understanding of Hebrew, it makes perfect sense.
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Overplaying the convict card?

Posted by barbara on July 3, 2011

What have convicts to do with contemporary Australia and the millions of Australians who were born overseas from the 1850s onwards?
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'Thunderbolt' holes up in the granite belt

Posted by barbara on August 9, 2011

And why not set up business in a part of the country that offers ready made shelter for both man and horse?
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Wraps come off Lawsons-Menzies makeover

Posted by barbara on August 14, 2011

The adaptive reuse of the historic Lawsons-Menzies auctioneers premises at 212-218 Cumberland Street, The Rocks is nearing completion, on the outside at least.
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Thunderbolt's Gully channels World War 11 tank traps

Posted by barbara on September 4, 2011

The very same gully that northern NSW bushranger Captain Thunderbolt chose as a hideout was selected as the choke point for south bound invading Japanese forces.
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The time has come for the transformation of the 1952 era MSB headquarters into a new look hybrid 2012 MCA.
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Thunderbolt's exploits may soon be heritage listed

Posted by barbara on July 5, 2012

Will the 1860s hang out, shoot out site and grave of Captain Thunderbolt, akka Fred Ward, the 'stick 'em up' man of the Upper Hunter and New England region, be added to the State Heritage Register?
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Spotlight on the Sydney suburb of West Pymble

Posted by barbara on July 12, 2012

Who would have thought that this small North Shore suburb might have such a surprisingly diverse history?
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Colonial artists help piece the past together

Posted by barbara on October 14, 2012

When it comes to working out what happened where, we owe a big debt to colonial artists in the pre photography era.
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Happy northern hemisphere winter solstice!

Posted by barbara on December 24, 2012

Christmas, yuletide, whatever it's termed, the magic of Christmas for northern hemisphere dwellers is that winter is on the wane and spring on the comeback!
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The legacy of asbestos dogs the health of Terowie, the setting for General Douglas MacArthur's famous fighting words during a change of trains after his flight from the Philippines.
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Interpreting the Adelong Falls Gold Mill Ruins

Posted by barbara on February 13, 2013

With the wooden and metal infrastructure of this heritage gold ore crushing site long gone, it takes words and images to piece together what exactly happened and where.
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Grace Bussell, the darling of Western Australia

Posted by barbara on June 15, 2013

Heros come and go. Less so heroines.
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Now the Hume Highway, stretches of the 'Great South Road' were constructed by convicts housed at the Towrang stockade.
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The Katoomba landslide fades into obscurity?

Posted by barbara on July 7, 2013

Eighty or so years after NSW's most watched and waited for landslide, time has 'healed' the once stark scar.
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Australia's oldest church?

Posted by barbara on August 3, 2013

One might assume that Australia's oldest operational church might be located in the heart of Sydney's CBD. Not so!
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When the Europeans met the First Australians

Posted by barbara on September 21, 2013

How well-intentioned and relatively peaceful was the European invasion of Australia in 1788? Not at all, according to popular culture. But is that the truth of the matter?
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Artimore Station, Far North South Australia

Posted by barbara on October 5, 2013

In 1903, 100 years ago, the owners of Artimore Station north of Blinman, SA, walked off, leaving behind a suite of homestead buildings that have been gradually reduced to ruins.
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The start of World War I, 100 years on

Posted by barbara on August 3, 2014

As a stretcher bearer, my grandfather's job was to find the injured, apply basic first aid, and carry them back to the casualty clearing stations.
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Whether you are for or against war, there's a lot to like about the AWM's 'new-fashioned' World War I exhibition, including the conspicuous return of the dioramas.
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Just over 40 years after NSW's Port Jackson and Sydney Cove was 'found', to the dismay of its Indigenous land owners, the township of Berrima south of Sydney (and Mittagong) was established.
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Revisiting The Dog on the Tucker Box

Posted by barbara on September 11, 2015

Do BIG 'statues' really generate tourist dollars? Life sized as it is, thanks to its neighbouring franchises, the lifesized Dog on the Tucker Box still retains of pulling power.
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Warragamba Dam = death knell to Burragorang Valley

Posted by barbara on October 27, 2015

It was widely regarded as 'progress' when the mighty Warragamba Dam was completed in 1960 and Sydney's water supply was seemingly 'guaranteed'. But at what price for the upstream Burragorang Valley?
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Impressed by Ancestry's 'Come find me' advertisements?

Posted by barbara on January 20, 2016

There's a big difference between what these emotive advertisements offer potential users and the laborious task of building one's family tree.
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Australia Day versus Anniversary Day?

Posted by barbara on January 26, 2016

Why stick with 26 January? It's a divisive date, relevant to NSW but not to the rest of Australia so why not change it for something more appropriate.
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Shearing sheds across Australia

Posted by barbara on April 2, 2016

What kind of shed do the majority of Australians picture when they hear the bush ballad, 'Click Go The Shears'?
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South Sea Islands and the Supercargos

Posted by barbara on November 12, 2016

In 1915 my grandfather took a 'gap year' of sorts when he joined up with the Burns Philp shipping company and steamed to the South Sea Islands, including the New Hebrides (now Vanuatu).
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South Sea Island trading and the Supercargos

Posted by barbara on May 5, 2017

During the late 1800s and early 1900s, shipping companies despatched steamers to the South Sea Islands to collect commercial commodities and cash crops from remote islands and sell trade goods to the local planters, missionaries and locals who'd adopted European ways.
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